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Idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosis

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Diagnosis

  1. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder typically affecting young, obese women, producing a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without identifiable cause. State of the art: There continues to be no evidence-based consensus or formal guidelines regarding management and treatment of the disease
  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is caused by an elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). The condition mainly affects obese young women of childbearing age. Its prevalence ranges between 0.5 and 2 per 100,000 of the general population and is expected to increase further given the worldwide increase in obesity (1). The underlying caus
  3. What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) happens when high pressure around the brain causes symptoms like vision changes and headaches. Idiopathic means the cause isn't known, intracranial means in the skull, and hypertension means high pressure
  4. Intracranial hypertension can be either acute or chronic. In chronic IIH, the increased CSF pressure can cause swelling and damage to the optic nerve - a condition called papilledema. Because the symptoms of IIH can resemble those of a brain tumor, it is sometimes known by the older name pseudotumor cerebri, which means false brain tumor
  5. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder related to high pressure in the brain. It causes signs and symptoms of a brain tumor. It is also sometimes called pseudotumor cerebri or benign intracranial hypertension. The fluid that surrounds the spinal cord and brain is called cerebrospinal fluid or CSF

Identification of papilloedema is a common source of error in the diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH); it is both under- and over-diagnosed. Therefore, where doubt exists, ensure that there is a specialist doctor confirming its presence Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a disorder of increased intracranial pressure that occurs mainly in overweight women of childbearing years, often in the setting of weight gain. Wall M. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, especially, is a common but underdiagnosed problem that is postulated to mainly affect obese women in child-bearing age Pseudotumor cerebri (SOO-doe-too-mur SER-uh-bry) occurs when the pressure inside your skull (intracranial pressure) increases for no obvious reason. It's also called idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Symptoms mimic those of a brain tumor. The increased intracranial pressure can cause swelling of the optic nerve and result in vision loss

Diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic intracranial

Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) is a headache syndrome characterised by (1) raised cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass lesion or ventricular dilatation; (2) normal spinal fluid composition; (3) usually normal findings on neurological examination except for papilloedema and an occasional VI nerve palsy; and (4) normal level of consciousness. The. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), formerly known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a condition that affects the brain. Pseudotumor cerebri literally translates to false brain tumor. This term was used because symptoms of IIH resemble those of brain tumors depsite no tumor being present

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a disorder of increased intracranial pressure that occurs mainly in overweight women of childbearing years, often in the setting of weight gain. Its cause is not known (hence the preferred name IIH) Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition where pressure inside your head rises, causing vision problems, headaches and other symptoms.This happens when fluid from the brain (called cerebrospinal fluid, or CSF) does not flow out of the head as it should Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder related to high pressure in the brain. It causes signs and symptoms of a brain tumor. It's also sometimes called pseudotumor cerebri or benign intracranial hypertension. The fluid that surrounds the spinal cord and brain is called cerebrospinal fluid or CSF Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), previously known as pseudotumor cerebri and benign intracranial hypertension, is a condition characterized by increased intracranial pressure (pressure around the brain) without a detectable cause

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension National Eye Institut

  1. Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is most often diagnosed in young obese females of childbearing years. The diagnosis is made based on the modified Dandy criteria and the exclusion of alternate causes of raised intracranial pressure
  2. ation. Other potential high risk groups are discussed separately
  3. The accurate diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is essential as visual deterioration due to papilledema may be irreversible. Given its phenotypic similarity and frequent overlap with chronic migraine it is essential to consider idiopathic intracranial hypertension in the diagnostic workup of chronic headache; in particular, when considering its increasing prevalence

Diagnosis / Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertensio

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Cedars-Sina

  1. The aim was to capture interdisciplinary expertise from a large group of clinicians, reflecting practice from across the UK and further, to inform subsequent development of a national consensus guidance for optimal management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Methods Between September 2015 and October 2017, a specialist interest group including neurology, neurosurgery.
  2. A >100,000 U/day, tetracycline, amiodarone, sulfa antibiotics, lithium, thyroid disorders, and historically nalidixic acid (rarely used)
  3. Diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is suspected clinically and established by brain imaging (preferably MRI with magnetic resonance venography) that has normal results (except for narrowing of the venous transverse sinus), followed, if not contraindicated, by lumbar puncture with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) testing that indicates elevated opening pressure and normal CSF composition
  4. The diagnosis and management of idiopathic intracranial hypertension and the associated headache. Ther Adv Neurol Disord. 2016; 9 (4): p.317-326. doi: 10.1177/1756285616635987 . | Open in Read by QxMD; Thurtell MJ, Wall M. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (pseudotumor cerebri): recognition, treatment, and ongoing management
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  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a syndrome characterized by elevated intracranial pressure that usually occurs in obese women in the childbearing years. The signs and symptoms of intracranial hypertension are that the patient maintains an alert and oriented mental state, but has no localizing neurologic findings
  7. The European Headache Federation has issued recommendations on how to best diagnose and treat idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), according to a new guideline published in the Journal of.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Update on diagnosis

Background: Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a clinical syndrome of raised intracranial pressure without any identifiable cause. It typically affects obese women of child-bearing age. Clinical Features: Headaches, transient visual disturbances, pulse-synchronous tinnitus. Clinical diagnosis is supported by high opening pressures on lumbar puncture Foley introduced benign intracranial hypertension in 1955 (11) (it remains the default terminology in ICD-9 and ICD-10) (12), but this name is now strongly discouraged, since benign implies no permanent or devastating sequelae, and in upwards of 25% of patients with IIH will have severe debilitating visual loss (13-15)

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension - Symptoms, diagnosis

Dr. Eugene May Discusses Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Diagnosis and TreatmentSwedish Neuroscience Institute, Neuro-OphthalmologySeattle, W Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH), is sometimes referred to by an old name, pseudotumor cerebri (PTC). It is a disorder in which the intracranial pressure (ICP) within the skull is increased, without mass lesion or enlarged ventricles (the spaces within the brain). 3 Anyone can develop IIH regardless of age, gender, weight, or ethnicity, but obesity is a major factor Symptoms of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Idiopathic intracranial hypertension usually begins with a daily or almost daily headache, which affects both sides of the head. At first, the headache may be mild, but it varies in intensity and may become severe Establishing the diagnosis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is defined as elevated intracranial pressure without clinical, radiologic, or laboratory evidence of a secondary cause. The most frequently cited incidence data for IIH in the general population of the United States is from a study by Durcan, et al, 1 who reported the annual.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), historically referred to as benign intracranial hypertension or pseudotumor cerebri, is a clinical syndrome with elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure (> 250 mmH 2 O) as measured with the patient in a lateral decubitus position, with normal composition, without any evidence of hydrocephalus. Discussion. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a condition in which the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is under high pressure in the absence of an intracranial mass, venous sinus thrombosis or other primary cause (see differential diagnosis) At diagnosis, 93% of patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension complain of headache. 11 Headache is one of the most common reasons for primary care visits and ranks among the top 10 disabling conditions worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. 15 In women, headache ranks among the top five causes of disability. 15.

Diagnosing idiopathic intracranial hypertension . Diagnosis of IIH is based on history, physical examination, imaging tests and lumbar puncture. Neuroimaging, usually with computed tomography (CT/CAT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), is used to rule out any tumor or disease Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder related to high pressures of spinal fluid in the brain. It causes signs and symptoms of a brain tumor. It is also sometimes called pseudotumor cerebri or benign intracranial hypertension. The fluid that surrounds the spinal cord and brain is called cerebrospinal fluid or CSF Idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Dr Bahman Rasuli and Dr Paresh K Desai et al. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a syndrome with signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure but where a causative mass or hydrocephalus is not identified. On this page The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation is the only non-profit organization in the world devoted to supporting the medical research of chronic intracranial hypertension. We also provide assistance, education, and encouragement for individuals with chronic IH, their families and medical professionals Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension 8 Things That Help My Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Symptoms Living with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a nightmare, more for some than others

Intracranial hypertension: Beyond CSF

Diagnosis and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension Naz Raoof1,2 and Jan Hoffmann3,4 Abstract Objective: To review and discuss the clinical presentation and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Discussion: Visual alterations and headache are the two main symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension Read more about Diagnosis & Treatments. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as benign intracranial hypertension or pseudotumour cerebri, is a condition with an unknown cause or causes. The condition is associated with raised fluid pressure around the brain. The fluid that cushions the brain is called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder characterised by symptoms and signs of increased intracranial pressure without any clear cause evident on neuroimaging and other investigations. It is also known as pseudotumour cerebri. The primarily affected group are overweight women of childbearing age Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is characterized by obesity, headaches, nausea, papilledema, transient visual obscurations, and pulsatile tinnitus. Untreated, it can result in optic nerve injury, consequent visual field defects, and blindness. It continues to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge, and the incidence is rising as obesity. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder of unknown etiology that predominantly affects obese women of childbearing age. The primary problem is chronically elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), and the most important neurologic manifestation is papilledema, which may lead to progressive optic atrophy and blindness

Pseudotumor cerebri - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clini

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), previously referred to as pseudotumor cerebri or benign intracranial hypertension, was recognized initially in adults by Quincke in 1893 as meningitis serosa.. ( 1) The syndrome is characterized by elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) without any evident underlying neurologic disease Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a build-up of cerebrospinal fluid around the brain, which causes increased pressure inside the skull (intracranial hypertension); however, people with IIH are still alert and orientated and able to function. Idiopathic means that the cause has not been identified Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension is a condition in which there is an increase in the pressure of the skull without any obvious reason. Its symptoms mimic those of brain tumor, but there is not any presence of tumor

Diagnosis and management of benign intracranial hypertensio

Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) The condition usually occurs in obese women of childbearing age (but can less frequently occur in other situations). The impact for patients is a chronic condition with considerable disability from chronic headaches, impaired vision (which can be permanent) and poor quality of life In idiopathic intracranial hypertension there is raised pressure within the skull (raised intracranial pressure), which puts pressure on the brain. Idiopathic means that the cause of this raised pressure is unknown. The main symptoms are headache and loss of sight (visual loss). It mostly affects women of childbearing age who are overweight or.

Diagnosis: Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Description of Image : History of present illness: The patient is a 27-year-old woman, 5 ½ weeks pregnant, who presented to the neuro-ophthalmology clinic with a one-week history of peripheral vision loss in both eyes Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a neurological condition characterised by increase in intracranial pressure likely due to obstruction in venous drainage without the evidence of a mass, lesion or hydrocephalus. Know the causes, symptoms, treatment, prognosis, pathophysiology, risk factors of idiopathic intracranial hypertension Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder in which the fluid that surrounds and protects the brain and spinal cord (cerebrospinal fluid, or CSF) accumulates abnormally for an unknown reason, causing increased pressure within the skull. Because the symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension can mimic those of a brain tumor, the. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension typically occurs in women of childbearing age. Incidence is 1/100,000 in normal-weight women but 20/100,000 in obese women. Intracranial pressure (ICP) is elevated (> 250 mm H2O); the cause is unknown but probably involves obstruction of cerebral venous outflow, possibly because venous sinuses are smaller.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension Genetic and Rare

Objective To characterize trends in incidence, prevalence, and health care outcomes in the idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) population in Wales using routinely collected health care data. Methods We used and validated primary and secondary care IIH diagnosis codes within the Secure Anonymised Information Linkage databank to ascertain IIH cases and controls in a retrospective cohort. Answer: Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH). Background: Also known as pseudotumor cerebri, IIH is a disorder characterized by signs of increased intracranial pressure (headaches, vision loss, and papilledema) with no other cause detected on neuroimaging or other evaluations. Primarily affects obese women of childbearing age (women affected at 20 times the rate of men) but can occur in. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), also known as pseudotumor cerebri or benign intracranial hypertension (BIH), is a disorder characterized by chronically elevated intracranial pressure and signs and symptoms resulting from the raised intracranial pressure in the absence of any detectable underlying causative lesion or pathology

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a neurological condition characterized by increase in intracranial pressure likely due to obstruction in venous drainage without the evidence of a mass, lesion or hydrocephalus. (Know the causes, symptoms, treatment, risk factors and prognosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension - IIH - is a condition that consists of high pressure in the head. IIH is most prevalent in the female population of ages 20 to 45 years old and the prevalence of IIH is 0.5-2.0 per 100,000 in the general population of the United States Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is high pressure in the spaces around the brain and spinal cord, which are protected and nourished by cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Such pressure increase may result from a number of causes, but in people with IIH, the cause is not known. IIH can cause vision problems such as double vision and even. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion, therefore when doing a proper workup for suspected IIH, an ophthalmologist should make efforts to exclude other more serious causes of increased ICP. Questions concerning past history of headache, associated symptoms, history of drug use during or before pregnancy, past psychiatric history, and a thorough review.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a rare condition that usually affects overweight women. It is a diagnosis of exclusion in a pregnant woman presenting with Diagnosis of idiopathic intracranial hypertension The diagnostic characteristics of IIH were first postulated b Idiopathic intracranial hypertension symptoms are very wide-ranging which makes a proper diagnosis difficult. So what doctors look for are patients who are: overweight or obese; have hormone problems stemming from the adrenals or thyroid; have problems with medications or a combination of medications causing increased blood pressur

What is Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension? - American

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Update on diagnosis and management Authors: Benjamin R Wakerley, A Susan P MollanB and Alexandra J Sinclair C Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a condition of raised intracranial pressure of unknown cause. Features include new onset headache, which is frequently non-specific The syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without hydrocephalus or mass lesion and with normal CSF composition, previously referred to as pseudotumor cerebri, is a diagnosis of exclusion now termed idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). Diagnostic criteria of this disorder have not been updated since the Modified Dandy Criteria were articulated in 1985

What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH, also known as pseudotumor cerebri) is a condition in which the pressure in your head is elevated. The term idiopathic means that it occurs for unclear reasons, intracranial means inside the head, and hypertension means high pressure OBJECTIVE: To review and discuss the clinical presentation and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. DISCUSSION: Visual alterations and headache are the two main symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension, although additional features including cranial nerve palsies, cognitive deficits, olfactory deficits and tinnitus are not uncommon The diagnosis of IIH is made by identifying the typical symptoms of the disease along with documentation of a high spinal fluid pressure (measured during a spinal tap). The neurologic examination is normal except for the presence of swollen optic nerves called papilledema (seen by examining the back of the eye)

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension - Wikipedi

Digre KB, Bruce BB, McDermott MP, Galetta KM, Balcer LJ, Wall M, et al. Quality of life in idiopathic intracranial hypertension at diagnosis: IIH Treatment Trial results. Neurology . 2015 Jun 16. View/Print PDF. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), is a disorder of elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) occurring most commonly in obese women of childbearing age. Common symptoms include headache, reduced visual acuity and constriction of visual fields, pulsatile tinnitus, and a physical exam remarkable for papilledema and cranial. Showing 1-25: ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G93.2 [convert to ICD-9-CM] Benign intracranial hypertension. Hypertension, idiopathic intracranial; Increased intracranial pressure; Pseudotumor cerebri; Raised intracranial pressure; hypertensive encephalopathy (I67.4); obstructive hydrocephalus (G91.1); Pseudotumor. ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code G93.2

What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH)? IIH is a condition that causes the pressure inside your skull to be higher than normal for no known reason. IIH can seem like a brain tumor, but no tumor is found. IIH is most common in obese women who are of childbearing age After my diagnosis in October of 2008, I was surprised and dismayed to find so little information on this disease—it is also known as benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) or more commonly idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Sure, you can find medical reports and statistics, but the human side has been lost The diagnosis is Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension. What is Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension? Formally known as Pseudotumor Cerebri, Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension is a condition in which there is too much Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) and this increases the pressure around the brain Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a rare but important disease associated with significant morbidity. There is an expected rise in prevalence in line with the escalating global burden of obesity. Modern revisions in the terminology and diagnostic criteria for IIH help guide clinicians in investigations and researchers in standardising recruitment criteria for clinical trials

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idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). The incidence of IIH is increasing in line with the global epidemic of obesity. There are controversial issues in its diagnosis and management. This paper gives a practical approach to assessing patients with papilloedema, its investigation and the subsequent management of patients with IIH. INTRODUCTIO Discussion. IIH, also known as pseudotumor cerebri and benign intracranial hypertension, is a syndrome characterized by increased CSF pressure and papilledema in patients without focal neurologic findings, except for occasional CN VI palsy. It is a diagnosis of exclusion, and radiologic examinations are traditionally performed to help exclude lesions that produce intracranial hypertension. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a medical condition that results from increased spinal fluid pressure around the brain, in the absence of a tumor or other brain disorder. It is formerly known as pseudotumor cerebri. IIH is most common in women who are obese and in their childbearing years. Vladimir Vladimirov / Getty Images Weight loss is the cornerstone of therapy for idiopathic intracranial hypertension. We recommend a low salt, weight reduction diet with loss of about 5 - 10% of body weight followed by stable weight. This goal, of modest weight loss, is more likely to succeed than the usual aggressive weight loss program

PURPOSE OF REVIEW Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure of unclear etiology that most often occurs in obese women of childbearing age but can also occur in men, children, and older adults. This article reviews the diagnostic criteria, clinical features, neuroimaging findings, differential diagnosis, and management options for this condition Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, or pseudotumor cerebri, is a neurological disorder that is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of a tumor or other etiology seen on imaging.Symptoms include headache, pulsatile tinnitus, and visual symptoms such as diplopia. If untreated, it may lead to swelling of the optic disc that can be seen as papilledema on fundoscopy. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) [IIH] A neurological disorder in which the pressure within the skull is elevated and there is no presence of anything creating a mass effect. Idiopathic simply means, of unknown origin/cause, so Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension = Increased Pressure Inside the Skull, Without a Known Cause Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), formerly known as pseudotumor cerebri, is a condition that affects the brain. Pseudotumor cerebri literally translates to false brain tumor.. This term was used because symptoms of IIH resemble those of brain tumors depsite no tumor being present

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension: consensus guidelines

Overview. Every year, approximately one to two people in 100,000 are diagnosed with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). 1 IIH is a disorder in which there is evidence of increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure in the head and spine without an obvious cause. Symptoms can include debilitating headaches and vision problems Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) occurs when there is pressure in the skull caused by an increased volume of spinal fluid. The increased pressure causes a sudden but intense headache, as well as a loss or inhibition of vision. IIH is often initially diagnosed as a brain tumor and is more common in women than men

A practical approach to, diagnosis, assessment andTeaching NeuroImages: Idiopathic intracranial hypertensionAll-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induced intracranial

Disease Entity Disease. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (IIH) is a disease characterized by elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) without a cause that is associated with signs and symptoms, radiographic features, and lumbar puncture findings confined to increased ICP, in an alert and oriented patient Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder related to high pressure in the brain. Even though IIH isn't a brain tumor, it can still cause serious health problems. Seeing a healthcare provider right away to promptly diagnose symptoms and begin treatment can help to prevent complications Benign intracranial hypertension (BIH) (also known as pseudotumor cerebri and empty sella syndrome) remains a diagnostic challenge to most physicians. The modified Dandy criteria consist of, the classic findings of headache, pulsatile tinnitus, papilledema, and elevated cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, however, these are rarely collectively present in any one patient Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition that causes the pressure inside your skull to be higher than normal for no known reason. IIH can seem like a brain tumor, but no tumor is found. IIH is most common in obese women who are of childbearing age. The cause of IIH may not be known Symptoms — In one case series and in the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial, the most common symptoms of idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were [2,3]: These symptoms, even as a cluster, are not specific for IIH. In one case­control study, these symptoms were als Once the diagnosis of IIH is confirmed, initial treatment focuses on lowering intracranial pressure to relieve papilledema. Depending on the degree of papilledema, medications such as acetazolamide might be tried. If the IIH is fulminant or medication fails to adequately reduce pressure, surgery is recommended.. The classic surgical treatment involves the implantation of a shunt